disabled aids
disabled aids disabled equipment disabled aids
disabled equipment
  Disability Information for the Disabled from the Disabled.
disabled holiday information
DisabledInfo.co.uk - offering practical advice and information for the disabled from the disabled
DisabledInfo.co.uk offers advice and information for the disabled from the disabled
disabled holiday information
 
disabled holiday information
disabled equipment
disabled equipment
About the home
Finance
.. Employment
.. Income
.. Other Finance
disabled equipment
Health
Life is too short
Out of the home
Support groups
Travel
Your Stories
Home
Contribute
Chat Room
Disability Forums
Visitor FeedBack
Common Searches
FAQ's
Disability Links
About Us
Contact Us
Bookmark Us
Tell A Friend
 
 


disabled equipment disabled aids disabled equipment
   Finance > Other Finance > Scams - common quest
Disabledinfo
 
 
Scams - common questions

I have received an email/ text message/ telephone call telling me I have won some money in a lottery, is it legitimate?

A good piece advice to always remember is that if something seems too good to be true then it more than likely is.

There are many lottery scams in circulation from all over the world. Some are known as advance fee fraud, this is because they will tell you that in order to claim your prize money you have to send them some money first. This could be a fixed amount or a percentage of your alleged prize fund. No real lottery company would ask you to pay a fee before being able to claim your prize. If you pay the fee it is more than likely that you will not get your money back or ever see any of the supposed jackpot.

People have been defrauded out of vast amounts of money. It always pays to be sceptical when parting with money to a company/person you do not know anything about. A lot of 'scammers' ask for a certificate of non drug/terrorism (or similar) in order to appear more official, which as far as we are aware does not exist.

A further point to consider whether you have actually entered into a lottery? Large amounts of money are not just handed out to random people. If you have received an email, look at the website or email address to see if it is genuine, is it an authentic lottery company? If not then do not enter into any correspondence. Do not open attachments unless you are confident about the contents.

A recent scam is a letter purporting to be from the police confirming the authenticity of a letter regarding a lottery win. This is not true, the police do not authenticate commercial organisations.

The best advice is to delete the email/ text message or hang up the phone, do not enter into correspondence with the companies and do not send any money or personal details.

If you receive one of these emails and wish to forward it to the appropriate organisation the Office of Fair Trading has details of which organisations to report the matter to, see link in related information.


I have received an email/letter from someone telling me that I am going to inherit some money from a person I have never heard of or I have won on the lottery, what should I do?

This is known as 'phishing ' where the same email gets sent out to many people and the odds are that someone will reply.

There are a lot of different scams going around with the same theme. Either you are a long lost relative of a recently deceased person, you have been chosen to inherit a large amount of money from a person who does not have any living relatives or maybe you have won on the lottery.

* If you were a long lost relative it is unlikely that the executors would make contact with you via email.

* Is the phone number a mobile?

* Solicitors and executors of wills do not just hand over large sums of money without very thorough checks, so before you go any further check out the source of the communication.

* Go and speak to them in person at the Law Firm (if it is a scam it won't have been sent by lawyers at the firm, assuming it is a real firm that has been mentioned in the communication).

* Make sure they sent the letter.

* Payment for the execution of a will comes out of the dead person's estate not from the people likely to receive a bequest.

Its better the take that sort of trouble than pay out a lot of money on the basis of an email and a phone call to a mobile.

A recent scam is a letter purporting to be from the police confirming the authenticity of a letter regarding a lottery win. This is not true, the police do not authenticate commercial organisations.

DO NOT give out your personal details, bank account details or send any money to anyone who sends you such an email. Many people have been defrauded out of a lot of money. No matter how official it sounds it is highly unlikely that you will receive any money.

If something seems too good to be true then it usually is!

If you receive one of these emails/letters and wish to forward it to the appropriate organisation the Office of Fair Trading has details of which organisations to report the matter to, see link in related information.


I have received an email from my bank asking me to verify my account number and PIN number, is it genuine?

NO! A bank would NEVER ask you to reveal your PIN number to them.

Many people have received such emails, they look extremely official and many people have replied with their bank account details and have been defrauded out of a lot of money.

Do not reveal your PIN number to anyone. Banks may ask you for certain characters of your PIN number for security reasons but never for the whole number.


I am selling a car/other property and someone has offered to send me a cheque for a larger amount and said that I can keep 10% of what is left after taking off the amount for the car, is this a scam?

Yes it is.

You will pay the money into the bank and the cheque will more than likely clear. You will send off the car/other property and the remaining money and keep the 10%. A few days later your bank will contact you and inform you that the cheque is in fact stolen or fraudulent and they will debit your amount for the full amount of the cheque.

You will have lost the car/other property, the full amount of the cheque and also any remaining money that you sent the person back.

If you are at all unsure of a buyer then do not go ahead, wait for a genuine buyer. If that buyer is from overseas speak to your bank about the best and most secure method of receiving payment.


I got a forged bank note, what should I do?

If you are a shop owner or employee and you know or suspect the person who has passed it to you then you should put the note in a bag to preserve any fingerprint evidence and hand the note into the nearest police station. If there is no suspect the police may not get involved and you should therefore hand the note into a bank.

As a shop owner/business owner you should contact your local crime prevention officer who will be able to advise you on preventing further instances of this happening, and can ascertain whether there are any other shops or businesses in the area that has received any so that appropriate action can be taken.

If you have been passed a forged bank note in change when you have bought something you should hand it into the local police station and give details, if at all possible, of where you were given it. The police will keep the note as evidence.

UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES try to use or pass on the note to someone else, the penalty could be up to 10 years in prison and it just isn't worth the risk.
 
 
disabled equipment disabled aids disabled equipment
   
disabled equipment
 
 
  disabled holidays disabled aids disabled holidays disabled holidays disabled aids disabled holidays  
disabled equipment
disabled holiday information
 
disabled holiday information
disabled equipment
disabled equipment
disabled aids